Our nation is in the midst of an opioid addiction crisis. As a response, the DEA 360 Strategy takes an innovative three-pronged approach to combating heroin/opioid use through law enforcement, diversion control and community outreach. Learn more about how the opioid epidemic affects Knoxville.

Prevent Prescription Opioid, Heroin and Fentanyl Misuse

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What is Naloxone?

Learn more about the opioid overdose reversal drug. Plus, find out how you can get it in Tennessee.

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Resources for Educators

This page contains drug education resources ā€“ lesson plans, activities, videos ā€“ from different websites targeted to various grade levels that both parents and teachers can use. Read more.

 

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Red Ribbon Week

Red Ribbon Week, celebrated annually October 23-31, is the nationā€™s oldest and largest drug prevention awareness program. Learn more.


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NEWS

DEA 360 and Knox County Schools Host Smokies Baseball Game for Local Students

More than 6,000 local students recently watched as the Tennessee Smokies took on the Birmingham Barons during a matchup sponsored by DEA 360 and Knox County Schools. Read more.

Tennessee Teens Earn Top Prize in Video PSA Challenge

(May 9, 2019) The winners of the 2019 Operation Prevention Video PSA Challenge have just been announced! Read more.

Rate of women addicted to opioids during pregnancy quadrupled in 15 years, CDC says

(CNN, August 9) Between 1999 and 2014, the rate of opioid use disorder among women delivering babies increased more than 300 percent, according to a recently released report from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention. Read more.

Study links rising heroin deaths to 2010 OxyContin reformulation

(Notre Dame News, April 9) In 2010, the private pharmaceutical company Purdue Pharma tried to reformulate the powerful painkiller Oxycontin to make it less addictive. But, according to new research, this effort did not help to reduce nationwide drug overdoses and may have amplified the heroin epidemic. Read more.