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Consequences

  • Even If You Can Smoke Pot, That Doesn't Mean You Should Even If You Can Smoke Pot, That Doesn't Mean You Should

    (Chicago Sun-Times, Aug. 3) Just because it's there doesn't mean you should try it. It's an old adage that holds well when it comes to marijuana.

  • VIDEO: Fried Egg 2016VIDEO: Fried Egg 2016

    With the changing drug landscape, today's kids ask their parents very specific and challenging questions.

  • Laura Hope Laws, 17, Morphine and CocaineLaura Hope Laws, 17, Morphine and Cocaine

    Laura was an active church youth group member, a star varsity soccer player, and kind to many people. However, a prescription painkiller to treat a sports injury eventually led to her heroin addiction, and ultimately, an overdose on morphine, cocaine and alcohol.

  • Montana Sean Brown, 15, 25I-NBOMeMontana Sean Brown, 15, 25I-NBOMe

    Montana and his brothers thought they would have some fun trying LSD for the first time while their parents were out of town. Instead, the freshman football player took a deadly, clandestinely-made synthetic version that killed him.

  • VIDEO: The Promise of DrugsVIDEO: The Promise of Drugs

    When it comes to drugs and drug abuse, there's the promise and there's the reality. If you've ever felt the pressure to use drugs, you've probably heard the promise. Some promises are specific to a drug: "Meth can help you lose weight" or "Steroids will make you a better athlete." Other promises are vague: "Getting high will help you relax." Watch this animated video to learn more about the promise and reality of drug use and abuse.

  • VIDEO: Taking Prescription Drugs to Get High—A Bad IdeaVIDEO: Taking Prescription Drugs to Get High—A Bad Idea

    97% of teens don't use prescription drugs to get high. Watch this video to learn why taking prescription drugs to get high can have serious health effects including addiction and overdose.

  • The Negative Health Effects of Marijuana UseThe Negative Health Effects of Marijuana Use

    “Besides being addictive, marijuana is cognitively impairing even beyond the phase of acute intoxication and regular use during adolescence may cause a significant, possibly permanent IQ loss. Brain scans in users who started when they were young show impaired neural development, probably because cannabis interferes with normal brain maturation.”  —Nora Volkow, MD, Director, National Institute of Drug Abuse, National Institute of Health      

  • Taylor Hooton, 17, SteroidsTaylor Hooton, 17, Steroids

    Taylor Hooton was a star pitcher on his high school team, a handsome teenager who had everything going for him. Until steroids caught up with him, and he took his own life.

  • Irma Perez, 14, EcstasyIrma Perez, 14, Ecstasy

    Irma was a 14-year-old girl from Belmont, California who took an Ecstasy pill. She became sick immediately—vomiting and writhing in pain—yet her friends did not seek medical help for her. Instead, they gave her marijuana, thinking it would relax her and possibly help her because they had heard it had medicinal qualities. Irma suffered for hours.

  • David Pease, 23, Heroin

    Dave spent most of his teen years looking for answers in a mixture of marijuana, cigarettes and alcohol.

  • David Manlove, 16, Inhalants

    As told by his parents When our son, David, was 13 and 14, we discovered he had tried drinking alcohol and smoking pot. We reiterated our rules that alcohol and drug use was unacceptable, and imposed what we felt were appropriate consequences. As parents who spent our teen and young adult years in the late 60's and 70's, we believed that we would know the signs of serious drug use, and thought David's actions were just the experimentation that lots of kids go through. But we were wrong.

  • Ian Eaccarino, 20, HeroinIan Eaccarino, 20, Heroin

    In his senior year of high school, his car was firebombed in the driveway of our home. In retrospect, we realized it was drug related, but at the time, the explanation he gave us made sense. It was all a lie. Drug activity is typically associated with violence and deception.

  • Jason Surks, 19, Prescription DrugsJason Surks, 19, Prescription Drugs

    I worked for a community-based substance abuse prevention agency and so did my son, Jason. Jason knew the dangers. We believed that he was not using drugs—we talked about it often. I was so convinced that he was not using that it became a sort of joke between us—as he would leave home at the end of a weekend, I would frequently say, “Jason, don’t do drugs.” “I know, Mom,” he would say, “I won’t.” But he did.

  • Efrain Marrero, 19, SteroidsEfrain Marrero, 19, Steroids

    We found our oldest son, Efrain, in our bedroom dead from a self–inflicted gunshot wound to the head. At age 19, Efrain had grown to be a fine, respectable and loving young man. Sure, he had his share of youthful stumbles along the way, but he responded well to our guidance. He had the highest respect for his parents and was very kind at heart. He adored his baby brother, Ethyn and younger sister, Erika. He was raised in a solidly Christian home, and had embraced his faith. A hard working young man, he was attending a local community college, studying hard—he had a plan for his life, a direction.

  • Treatment and RecoveryTreatment and Recovery

    The first step when you suspect your teen has a substance abuse problem is to have your child screened by a experienced medical doctor, certified substance abuse counselor, or an addiction specialist.

  • How Drugs Alter Brain Development and Affect TeensHow Drugs Alter Brain Development and Affect Teens

    Long-term drug use causes brain changes that can set people up for addiction and other problems.

  • Federal Student Aid and Consequences of a Drug Conviction

      Is it true that a drug conviction may affect a person’s eligibility for federal student aid? Answer: Yes, eligibility might be suspended if the offense occurred while the person was receiving federal student aid (grants, loans or work-study). When you complete the Federal Application for Federal Student Aid(FAFSA) you will be asked:

  • Physical Health Consequences of Drug Use

    Drug abuse can have a serious, life-changing impact on your child: their physical and mental health is at stake.  Here’s where you’ll learn more about the health consequences that drug abuse has on your teen.

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