Latest News

prescription pill bottle

Heart Surgery Leads to Long-Term Opioid Use for Some

(HealthDay News, June 22) About 10% of heart surgery patients who are prescribed opioids are still using their prescriptions after three months, according to new research.

emergency room sign

'Iso,' a Deadly New Synthetic Opioid, Has Hit American Streets

(HealthDay News, June 9) Isotonitazene, also known as “iso,” is a new synthetic opioid is behind an increasing amount of overdose deaths, according to experts.

prescription bottle filled with marijuana buds

Legal Pot Products Too Potent for Chronic Pain

(Health Day News) More than 90% of legal medical marijuana has more than the recommended amount of THC for pain relief, according to a recent study. 

prescription pill bottles

If Prescribed Opioids for Pain, Ask Lots of Questions: FDA

(Health Day News, May 21) Deaths involving prescription opioids quadrupled between 1999 and 2018, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  

pregnant woman in hospital

Opioid prescriptions after childbirth may up overdose risk: Study

(Telangana Today, June 10)  Mothers who are prescribed opioid meds after giving birth are more at risk of overdosing, according to a new study.  

Today's high potency weed raises risk of anxiety and addiction, study says

(CNN, May 27) People who smoke potent marijuana are more at risk of developing general anxiety disorder and becoming addicted than people who smoke less powerful strains, according to recent research.

overdose written on chalkboard

Report: Alcohol, Drug and Suicide Deaths Exceeded 150,000

(Well Being Trust, May 21) In 2018, 151,964 Americans lost their lives due to alcohol, drugs or suicide, according to a recently released report.

New designer opioid linked to overdose deaths in Ohio, Illinois and Indiana

(USA Today, May 18) A ‘designer’ opioid, called isotonitazene, has been found in the bodies of people who died from overdose in Midwestern states. 

More Opioids Doesn't Mean Less Chronic Pain: Study

(HealthDay News, May 21) According to a study, increased doses of opioid-based painkillers actually won’t help people who suffer from chronic pain.

sad teen girl

Stress and Boredom During COVID-19 Leading to Increased Rates of Drug and Alcohol Use

(Erie News Now, May 12) In recent weeks, substance misuse has been increasing as a majority of people have been required to stay at home due to the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic.